Suresh Singaratnam

 

Press

 

...The trumpeter whose Christmas tune comforted an anxious nation. Suresh Singaratnam saw a nation of people desperate for a bit of spiritual uplift, and brought his musical vision to life...Shannon ProudfootMaclean's Magazine
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To be transported from stress and worry—if only for a brief moment—this song can surely do the trick. To paraphrase the great Billy Strayhorn, "That Is You" is a lovesome thing.Mark F. Turner allaboutjazz.com
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Lost In New York is an outstanding album of intricate jazz played by some of the best musicians the jazz scene currently has to offer. Singaratnam has produced a mature and first class effort making this album hard to ignore. This is an essential purchase for all jazz fans and one which I highly recommend.Jon Neudorfseaoftranquility.org
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Suresh Singaratnam, a composer, wanted to write a new Christmas song that celebrates Canada, the land, and of course the people. This year a hundred and seventy musicians and singers came together and helped it come alive. A Canadian Christmas is our moment.David CommonCBC's The National
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Meet Suresh Singaratnam . Like Wynton Marsalis, to whom he will often very likely be compared, Singaratnam is trained in both the classical and jazz traditions. His first two records offered classical music — 2009’s Two Hundred Sixty-One, Volume 1 — and jazz — 2010’s Lost in New York, the subject of this review. To have a career begin in impressive musical presence of Marsalis is a bit much, so let us give Singaratnam enough space to let him be his own man. He’s not lost at all. He finds his way pretty well, no matter what music he’s playing...From the writing and arranging, to the personnel in the band and the flat out monster playing on this release, I was thoroughly impressed.Mark E. HayeseJazzNews
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Suresh Singaratnam is a major talent with interesting ideas and good taste in bandmates, and this album is recommended to any fan of genuinely modern jazz.Phil Freemanallmusic.com
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Great songwriting and great playing from a well-chosen group of musicians - Lost in New York is a superb debut that deserves your attention. jazzchicago.net
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An impressive work, Lost In New York gives the strong impression of a confident and talented composer and musician, part of the city rather than lost within it.Bruce Lindsayallaboutjazz.com
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This trumpeter is probably most likely to follow in Marsalis' footsteps. Still the young lion with something to prove, Singaratnam can play in jazz and classical modes with ease, but this set is all about putting the chops first, front and center. A solid set for fans of sitting down jazz, this is the kind of set that spreads the word well. midwestrecord.com
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Within a few notes, you’ll hear the gifted Singaratnam’s voice ascend without boundaries in this inimitable compilation of unexpected textural shapes, colors and nuances implanted throughout the balance of this adventurous gem of a masterpiece...

...The conduit of music encompass here is a fortress of ambitious compositions that materializes from a collage of immeasurable tenor which accurately externalizes Suresh Singaratnam’s artistic vision as he eloquently developed a repertoire of music that is complex, compelling, exciting and very interesting. Highly recommended!Rob YoungThe Urban Flux
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Indeed, I was knocked out of my chair this weekend by trumpeter Suresh Singaratnam‘s new CD, Lost in New York. It’s a mindblower of mood-swings from mellow to scorching. Zoom Street
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Lost in New York is a 68-minute, nine-chapter novel of a boy and his trumpet, making his way to the city and experiencing many life lessons. The CD, with a lengthy booklet filled with beautiful graphic illustrations, is a finely composed suite, merging jazz and the classical in contemporary fashion. Colors are rich, instruments are warm unless intentionally cold, and the storyline is continuous. It doesn’t seem appropriate to name individual tracks, since there is a solid sense of unity from “Temporal Incursions” to “Peripheral Fission”. An absolute must.Layla Macoranexaminer.com
A jazz-rock album that makes refreshing sense is Suresh Singaratnam's Lost in New York. Everything about this new CD from trumpeter Singaratnam is exciting, from the tight jazz lines to the restless fusion arrangements. None of the songs overstay their welcome and all delight with energy and innovation. What's notable about this album is what happens when you start to play any of the tracks. You find you want the track to remain on. Sample Temporal Incursions and Chrysanthemum to see what I mean. What's more, all compositions and arrangements are by Singaratnam. This is hot stuff.JazzWax
While packaged in an edgy graphic comic context, the music here presented by trumpeter Suresh Singaratham is impressive hard bop in the Jazz Messenger vein. The core team of Jake Saslow/ts, Jesse Lewis/g, Fabian Almazan/p, Fraser Hollins/b and Lee Pearson/dr give a youthful and Gen Y vigor to stretched out tunes like “Temporal Incursions” and “Remnants Of Eternity” while bridging the generation gap between Young Lions and Baby Boomers.

Singaratnam’s trumpet is dynamic and searching, with a hint of Hubbard to keep it spiced up. Except for the pensive vocal “Spring for All But Me” with Charenee Wade, the music keeps you driving forward and on your toes, with Saslow’s tenor filled with grit, and Almazan’s piano keeping the Tyner torch burning. They’ve got a nice ability to keep one foot in the tradition and another on the escalator going up. Nice work here.George W. HarrisJazzWeekly.com